New Normality? – Abstract #11

Ece Göztepe: The Permanency of the State of Emergency in Turkey. The Rise of a Constituent Power or Only a New Quality of the State?

Working on the state of emergency/exception requires inevitably an idea of normality. For the first time the Roman law came up with the idea of ruling the state of exception before the exceptional conditions emerge and the Romans decided to locate the exceptional power beside the normal system. Even the terms and the content of the exceptional powers of the Roman dictators have been changed over time, the separation of their extra-legal powers from the regular system and the system-intern control of these powers stayed the core of the regulations. On the other hand, most of the modern constitutional states have preferred to locate the exceptional, mostly executive powers, within the system and guaranteed a parliamentary and especially judicial control over the use of these constitution-based powers. So, the normative rules on the state of exception in modern constitutional states are still a dependent variable. The state of emergency regimes is seen as a special form of upholding the rule of law principles and are bounded to the status quo with help of the courts.This article examines the evolution of the normative regulations of the state of emergency in Turkey in the light of the jurisprudence of the Turkish Constitutional Court. Despite the constitutional restriction in Article 148 par. 1 that forbids the constitutionality control of the emergency decrees by the Constitutional Court the Turkish Constitution of 1982 could have also been subordinated to the system of modern constitutional states. The articlesummarizes the interpretation of the restrictive constitutional norms by the Turkish Constitutional Court in the 1990’s in a very progressive way. In the second part I analyse the content of the thirty-two state of emergency decrees as of the attempted coup d’état in July 15th, 2016 and show the shift from the state of exception regime under the rule of law to the non-revolutionary constituent power without any legal restrictions. The main subject of this analysis is to show the “legal revolutionary effect” of the TCC decisions after October 2016 which have abandoned its former concept of the constitutional limits of the emergency regimes and in fact give up its own functional existence and legitimacy within the constitutional system.

Das Nachdenken über den Ausnahmezustand bedingt unvermeidlich die Idee der Normalität. Zunächst brachte das römische Recht die Idee zur Regelung des Ausnahmezustandes vor dem Erscheinen der Ausnahmezustände hervor und platzierte die Ausnahmekompetenzen außerhalb des normalen Systems. Auch wenn die Amtszeit und die Kompetenzen des römischen Diktators sich im Laufe der Zeit änderten, blieb die Unterscheidung zwischen den Ausnahmeregelungen und dem normalen Rechtssystem sowie die systeminterne Kontrolle der Ausnahmekompetenzen das Hauptmerkmal des römischen Systems. Auf der anderen Seite haben die meisten Verfassungsstaaten Ausnahmezustandsregelungen mit erweiterten Exekutivkompetenzen innerhalb des Rechtssystems bevorzugt, die parlamentarischer sowie judikativer Kontrolle unterworfen sind. Somit sind solche Kompetenzen in modernen Verfassungsstaaten immer abhängige Variablen in Bezug auf die reguläre Rechtsordnung. Die Ausnahmezustandsregime werden in dieser Hinsicht als eine spezielle Form zur Aufrechterhaltung des Rechtsstaates betrachtet und sind durch die judikative Kontrolle dem status quo unterworfen. Dieser Beitrag untersucht die Entwicklung der normativen Regelungen zum Ausnahmezustand in der Türkei unter Bezugnahme der Rechtsprechung des Türkischen Verfassungsgerichts. Auch wenn Art. 148 Abs. 1 der Verfassung die Verfassungsmäßigkeitskontrolle von Ausnahmerechtsverordnungen verbietet, kann die Türkische Verfassung von 1982 zu modernen Verfassungsstaaten gezählt werden. Der Beitrag fasst die progressive Auslegung der genannten restriktiven Verfassungsregelungen durch das Türkische Verfassungsgericht in den 1990er Jahren zusammen. Im zweiten Teil wird der Übergang zu einer weniger progressiven Rechtsprechung ab 2015 erklärt. Im Anschluss wird der Rückzug vom Ausnahmezustand im Rahmen des Rechtsstaates zu einer nicht-revolutionären verfassungsgebenden Gewalt ohne normative Schranken anhand der dreiundzwanzig Ausnahmerechtsverordnungen nach dem versuchten Putsch am 15. Juli 2016 analysiert. Das Hauptanliegen dieser Analyse liegt darin, die Wirkung der verfassungsgerichtlichen Rechtsprechung nach Oktober 2016 zu zeigen, die an einer „legalen Revolution“ grenzt und den Ausnahmezustand seinen verfassungsrechtlichen Grenzen entledigt hat. Im Endeffekt kommt dies der Selbstaufgabe der funktionalen Existenz und Legitimität des Verfassungsgerichts im Rechtssystem gleich.

Keywords: Turkey, state of emergency, constitution.

This article is part of the forthcoming issue Matthias Lemke  / Ece Göztepe / Olivier Cahn (Ed.), New Normality? State of Emergency as Contemporary Government Technique.

State of Exception – New Normality?

This is a short preview of the contents of the forthcoming issue 3/2018 of the German Journal of Political Science (Zeitschrift für Politikwissenschaft, ZPol), dealing with various issues of state of emergency politics.  In the weeks to come, you can find abstracts for all articles (DE/EN) listed below on this blog. Titles or sequence of appearance might be subject to change.

Matthias Lemke  / Ece Göztepe / Olivier Cahn (Ed.), New Normality? State of Emergency as Contemporary Government Technique.

Introduction

Matthias Lemke (Lübeck)
What does State of Exception Mean? A Definitional and Analytical Approach

Theory

Ewa Atanassow (Berlin) / Ira Katznelson (New York)
State of Exception in the Anglo-American Liberal Tradition

Marie Goupy (Paris)
The State of Exception Theory of Carl Schmitt and the Ambivalent Criticism of Liberalism

Rafael Valim (São Paolo)
State of Exception: The Legal Form of Neoliberalism

Tobias Schottdorf (Lüneburg)
Law, Democracy and the State of Emergency. A Theory Centered Analysis of the Democratic Legal State in Times of Exception

History

Sabine Mischner (Freiburg)
The Temporalities of Exception. The Long Shadow of the American Civil War

Thomas Blanck (Cologne)
A Revolutionary State of Exception: Munich, 1918/1919

Hanno Balz (Baltimore)
Head of State of Exception. Federal German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt and the Supralegal Crisis Management during the 1970s

Politics

Anne-Marlen Engler (Berlin)
Shifting the Question to Law Itself: Agamben’s Permanent State of Exception and German Refugee Camps in Empirical Research

Myriam Feinberg (Haifa)
States of Emergency in France and Israel – Terrorism, ‘Permanent Emergencies’ and Democracy

Elisa Bertolini (Milan)
Democracy and the State of Exception. The Italian Experience

Ece Göztepe (Ankara)
The Permanency of the State of Emergency in Turkey. The Rise of a Constituent Power or Only a New Quality of the State?

Annette Förster (Aachen)
The Expansion of Executive Force in the War on Terror and its Impact on Domestic and International Norms

Dante Gatmaytan (Quezon)
Duterte, Judicial Deference, and Democratic Decay in the Philippines

Critique

Jan Christoph Suntrup (Bonn)
The Symbolic Politics of the State of Exception: Images and Performances

Julian Müller (Leipzig)
European Human Rights Protection in Times of Terrorism – the State of Emergency and the Emergency Clause of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)

Jonas Heller (Frankfurt/M)
Democracy and State of Eception as Dialectic between Demos and Population

Conclusion

Ece Göztepe (Ankara) / Olivier Cahn (Paris) / Matthias Lemke (Lübeck)
New Normality? Perspectives on Contemporary Research on State of Exception

For further information, please contact Matthias Lemke on behalf of the editors.

Basel 2018, Presentation #1

The Permanency of the State of Emergency in Turkey. The Rise of a Constituent Power or Only a New Quality of the State? 

Ece Göztepe, Bilkent University, Ankara

Working on the state of emergency/exception requires inevitably an idea of normality. For the first time the Roman law came up with the idea of ruling the state of exception before the exceptional conditions emerge and the Romans decided to locate the exceptional power beside the normal system. Even the terms and the content of the exceptional powers of the Roman dictators have been changed over time, the separation of their extra-legal powers from the regular system and the system-intern control of these powers stayed the core of the regulations. On the other hand most of the modern constitutional states have preferred to locate the exceptional, mostly executive powers, within the system and guaranteed a parliamentary and judicial control over the use of these constitution-based powers. So, the normative rules on the state of exception in modern constitutional states is still a dependent variable.

Despite the constitutional restriction in Article 148 par. 1 that forbids the constitutionality control by the Constitutional Court the Turkish Constitution of 1982 could have also been subordinated to the system of modern constitutional states. My paperwill put the emergency regime typologies briefly in a context to give an overview on the constitutional and legal foundations of emergency regimes in Turkey and then summarize the interpretation of these norms by the Turkish Constitutional Court in the 1990’s. In the second part I will analyse the content of the thirty-one state of emergency decrees as of the attempted Coup d’Etat in July 15th, 2016 and will show the shift from the state of exception regime under the rule of law to the non-revolutionary constituent power without any legal restrictions. The main subject of this analysis will be the TCC decisions after October 2016 which have abandoned its former concept of the constitutional limits of the emergency regimes and in fact give up its own functional existence and legitimacy within the constitutional system.

Gegenwartsdiagnosen zum Regieren im Ausnahmezustand – Programm online

Das  Programm zum Panel „Gegenwartsdiagnosen zum Regieren im Ausnahmezustand“ von Fabien Jobard (Centre Marc Bloch / CNRS) und Matthias Lemke (HS Bund – Bundespolizei) ist ab sofort online verfügbar. Neben den geplanten Vortragstiteln findet sich dort auch die dazugehörigen Abstracts. Ferner stehen auf den Seiten allgemeine Informationen zur Konferenz in Basel (Zeit, Ort, Anmeldemodalitäten etc.) zur Verfügung.

Panel „Gegenwartsdiagnosen zum Regieren im Ausnahmezustand“, Basel 2018

Vom 13. bis 15. September 2018 findet in Basel der Vierte Kongress der deutschsprachigen Rechtssoziologievereinigungen statt. Unter dem Oberthema „Abschaffung des Rechts?“ werden, wie auch schon auf den Vorgängerveranstaltungen in Luzern, Wien und Berlin, Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler aus der Rechts- und Politikwissenschaft, der Soziologie und weiteren benachbarten Disziplinen miteinander diskutieren.

„Gegenwartsdiagnosen zum Regieren im Ausnahmezustand“, so lautet der Titel des Panels, das Fabien Jobard (Berlin), Ece Göztepe (Ankara), Marie Goupy (Paris) und Matthias Lemke (Lübeck) zum Kongress organisieren. Die Abstracts zu den jeweiligen Vorträgen werden in den kommenden Wochen hier auf dem Blog vorgestellt.

 

Ausnahmezustand: Theoriegeschichte – Anwendungen – Perspektiven (8)

Ece Göztepe: Ein Paradigmenwechsel für den Sicherheitsstaat. Die Praxis des Ausnahmezustandes im Südosten der Türkei.

Ausnahmezustand. Theoriegeschichte - Anwendungen - Perspektiven.
Ausnahmezustand. Theoriegeschichte – Anwendungen – Perspektiven.

Die Verfassung der Türkei von 1982, die nach einem Coup d’Etat unter besonderen Umständen verabschiedet wurde, stand in ihrer ersten Fassung ganz unter dem Zeichen der Staatssicherheit und den entsprechenden Maßnahmen im Rahmen des Ausnahmezustandes. Die Rahmenbedingungen für das Ausrufen und die Ausführung des Ausnahmezustandes sind in Art. 119-122 TV festgelegt, die in den 1990er Jahren den rechtlichen Rahmen des Ausnahmezustandes im Südosten des Landes bildete. Das Verfassungsgericht griff diesem Zustand im Wege des „judicial activism“ ein und zwang die von der Exekutive ergriffenen Maßnahmen, die gemäß Art. 148 TV verfassungsgerichtlicher Kontrolle entzogen sind, in die Grenzen des Rechtsstaates. Der Beitrag befasst sich theoretisch wie normativ mit den politischen Voraussetzungen und Zielsetzungen des Ausnahmezustandes in der Türkei und konkret mit dem seit Oktober 2014 im Südosten der Türkei herrschenden rechtsfreien Raum, der von der bisherigen Rechtspraxis deutlich abweicht.

After the Military Coup in 1980, The Turkish Constitution of 1982 has been adopted under very special circumstances.  It stood in its very setting under the mark of state security and corresponding provisions in the parameters of the state of emergency in Turkey. The general framework of proclamation and implementation of state of emergency has been specified in Art. 119-122 of Turkish Constitution which has also been the main judicial framework for the state of emergency in the 1990s in Southeastern part of the country. The Turkish Constitutional Court (TCC) intervened to this situation in the way of so called “judicial activism” and restrained the provisions which has provided the executive a very large and undetermined field of action. So the TCC’s interventions provided despite Art.148 TC both judicial control to the decisions of the executive and determined the scope and the limits of the rule of law for the executive. This article deals with theoretical and normative prerequisites and objectives of the state of emergency in the Southeast of Turkey, which has been adopted since October 2014, has created a law-free space which has deviated obviously from the previous judicial practice.

Dieser Beitrag erscheint im kommenden Frühjahr in Matthias Lemke (Hg.), Ausnahmezustand. Theoriegeschichte – Anwendungen – Perspektiven, Wiesbaden 2017. Erscheinungstermin: 11.4.2017. 30.3.2017.